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Focusing on six words: Helping government do its job better

DorobekINSIDER: ConnellyWorks the basis of a new government PR team

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Editor’s note: Updated at 12:50p to add full press release…

Home___ConnellyWorks

ConnellyWorks, the public relations, marketing communications and events services, is merging with Yes&, a newly formed marketing agency, the DorobekINSIDER has learned.

The formal announcement will come later today.

Yes& is building a new firm that will focus on both public and private sector markets. Yes& was created by the merger of three established communications companies – PCI Communications, LeapFrog Solutions and Carousel30. ConnellyWorks becomes the latest addition to that group.

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAMzAAAAJGRlY2I3NTVmLWJlNWMtNDdjNS04MjAzLTAzNjYwNDRiNTk5MwAs part of the agreement, ConnellyWorks will continue to maintain its office in Arlington, VA. Furthermore, Joanne Connelly, who founded ConnellyWorks, will continue to serve as president of ConnellyWorks and will be part of the Yes& executive team

I will add the formal announcement to this post when it is released.

ConnellyWorks, founded some 15 years ago by Joanne Connelly, a former editor of Federal Computer Week, has been one of the cornerstones of the government IT market with business lines including public relations, events, and events management.

UPDATE: The full press release after the break:

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by cdorobek

February 28, 2018 at 8:30 AM

Posted in Circuit, community, GovMedia

DorobekINSIDER: Godspeed Justice Department deputy CIO Kevin Deeley

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Kevin DeeleyUPDATED with funeral information and other coverage.

Justice Department deputy chief information officer passed away over the weekend, reportedly from a heart attack, the DorobekINSIDER has learned.

Deeley, 55, was named deputy CIO in 2012 and his work was recognized with a Fed 100 award in 2014.

In an email to the Justice Management Division staff, Assistant Attorney General Lee Lofthus said:

It is with deep sadness that I am letting you know the heartbreaking news that Kevin Deeley passed away over the weekend. Kevin’s passing is a huge loss for JMD, the Department, and the entire federal IT community.

Kevin joined the Department in 1984, first serving at the Federal Bureau of Investigation Criminal Justice Information Services Division. Kevin was a longtime colleague in JMD, and most recently was appointed as Deputy Chief Information Officer in 2012 and managed OCIO’s internal operations, including policy, process, and the successful delivery of applications, networks, security, and data center services.

Kevin’s good humor and positive outlook, and willingness to tackle any task no matter how daunting or complicated, were his hallmarks. He will be dearly missed. We will provide additional information on service arrangements as they are made available. Please keep Kevin’s family and friends in your thoughts and prayers during this time.

As we get details, we will update this post.

Of course, our thoughts are with Deeley’s family and friends. Godspeed.

UPDATE: Deeley’s obituary via The Baltimore Sun:

On February 10, 2018; KEVIN THOMAS DEELEY; beloved spouse of Albert Eminizer; cherished son of Patricia Ann and the late Walter Gerald Deeley; dear brother of Patricia Pittman, Edward Deeley, James Deeley, Brian Deeley, Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Maureen Turney, and Sean Deeley. Kevin is also survived by numerous nieces, nephews, and other family members. Family will receive friends on Wednesday, February 14 from 3-5 & 7-9PM at STERLING-ASHTON-SCHWAB-WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE, INC., 1630 Edmondson Avenue, Catonsville, MD 21228; where a funeral service will be celebrated 1PM, Thursday, February 15. Interment in Meadowridge Memorial Park. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in his memory to BARCS, 301 Stockholm Street, Baltimore, MD 21230 (www.baltimoreanimalshelter.org) or MD SPCA, Development Office, 3300 Falls Road, Baltimore, MD 21211 (www.mdspca.org).

Other reports:

  • FCW: DOJ’s Kevin Deeley passes away
    • “Deeley had a long history with the agency, first joining it in 1984, serving at the FBI’s Criminal Justice Information Services Division. He was named deputy CIO in 2012 and managed the CIO Office’s internal operations, including policy, process and the delivery of applications, networks, security and data center services.”
  • FedScoop: Justice Deputy CIO Kevin Deeley passes away

Written by cdorobek

February 12, 2018 at 12:13 PM

Posted in Uncategorized

DorobekINSIDER: Roger Baker to leave VA ‘in the near future’

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Roger BakerRoger Baker, the chief information officer at the Department of Veterans Affairs, is leaving that post “in the near future.”

Baker doesn’t offer a final date, but some insiders suggest it could be as soon as March 1.

In the time of transition, Baker is the latest to announce that he is leaving his post. NASA CIO Linda Cureton announced she is leaving that post at the end of the month.

At VA, Baker oversees IT for the government’s second largest agency — a $3.3 billion budget and more than 7,000 IT workers.

The VA under Baker, who was confirmed by the Senate in May, 2009, has made remarkable progress and he has won just about every award — including Federal Computer Week’s 2013 Federal 100 award.  

The VA CIO is in a unique position given that post has power over government spending. In 2010, when Baker was recognized with the GCN civilian executive of the year, he stressed the importance of having the power of the purse and his ability to use that authority to bring about change. VA’s success should be a lesson to the rest of government, he said. Because VA has a consolidated IT appropriation, it allows Baker and his staff to force changes. “Money is power in the government,” he said. “Money is love.”

“The consolidated IT appropriation is absolutely essential to driving real change in the IT results of an agency,” he noted at the time, and he future said that all federal CIOs should have authority over their IT budgets, he added. “The results at VA, the second largest federal agency, speak for themselves,” Baker said. “Empower CIOs to make real change happen.”

Read Baker’s note to staff following the break:

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by cdorobek

February 15, 2013 at 2:01 PM

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with , ,

DorobekINSIDER poll: What is the government word of the year?

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The team at the Oxford American Dictionaries have selected GIF as the 2012 word of the year.

In case you don’t know:

GIF verb to create a GIF file of (an image or video sequence, especially relating to an event): he GIFed the highlights of the debate

The GIF, a compressed file format for images that can be used to create simple, looping animations, turned 25 this year, but like so many other relics of the 80s, it has never been trendier. GIF celebrated a lexical milestone in 2012, gaining traction as a verb, not just a noun. The GIF has evolved from a medium for pop-cultural memes into a tool with serious applications including research and journalism, and its lexical identity is transforming to keep pace.

Read the full blog post on the subject, including the other words that were in competition.

I’m not sure that would be my word of the years, but…

What should be the government word of the year?

Written by cdorobek

November 13, 2012 at 11:04 PM

Posted in Circuit, community, poll

DorobekINSIDER: GSA FAS Commissioner Kempf takes medical leave; Mary Davie named acting

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Steve Kempf,  the commissioner of the General Services Administration’s Federal Acquisition Service,
is taking 60-day medical leave. In the interim, the post will be filled by Mary Davie,  GSA Federal Acquisition Service’s assistant commissioner of the Office of Integrated Technology Services.

Details are still developing. It is unclear if Kempf’s leave has anything to do with GSA’s ongoing issues. In a note to staff, Kempf confirmed that there have been questions about GSA Federal Acquisition Service’s 2010 Organizational Performance Awards event.

GSA FAS Commissioner Steve Kempf

“I truly do not want to be leaving you at this important time. However, this is necessary if I am going to continue serving our country to the best of our ability,” Kempf said in the note to GSA staff.

Kempf was appointed the FAS commissioner effective July 10, 2010. In the role, he sets strategic direction and oversees the delivery of more than $50 billion of best-value products, services and solutions to federal customers. He served as acting commissioner from April through June 2010, and was the deputy commissioner before that.

GSA has been reeling from revelations about the Public Building Service 2010 Western Region Conference and allegations of extravagant spending. The GSA inspector general report on that incident forced the resignation of former Administrator Martha Johnson and several top agency officials.

After the jump, read the full text of the note that Kempf sent to FAS staff…

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by cdorobek

July 27, 2012 at 4:39 PM

Posted in Uncategorized

07.24.2012: GovLoop Insights’ DorobekINSIDER: Feds sounding off on government innovation; and making a biz case for open data

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On GovLoop Insights’ DorobekINSIDER for Tuesday 24 July 2012:

  • Government innovation — yes, I know people don’t believe those two words can go together. Insights about what YOU think about government innovation from a just released report. We’ll talk to Tom Fox from the Partnership for Public Service.
  • Is there a business case for open data… for open government. And how can you make open data work. The Commerce Department is hoping to answer those questions with a new competition. We talk to Brand Niemann — a former fed who has submitted for the Commerce Department’s contest — about open data.

Also… the 7-stories that impact government — another voice sounds off about the STOCK Act and another controversial GSA conference…

And in the DorobekINSIDER watercooler fodder… AC/DC and Iranian nuclear plants.

Written by cdorobek

July 24, 2012 at 6:52 PM

05.11.2012 DorobekINSIDER: Public Service Recognition Week: A look back at the highs and lows of the Secret Service

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Welcome to
 GovLoop Insights 

Issue of the Week with Chris Dorobek… where each week, our goal is to find an issue — a person — an idea — then helped define the past 7-days… and we work to find an issue that will also will have an impact on the days, weeks and months ahead. And, as always, we focus on six words: helping you do your job better.

This week has been
 Public Service Recognition Week and it comes on the heels of a lot of public service that probably that probably should not be recognized. Earlier this week, we unveiled the Partnership for Public Service Service to America Medal finalists — the
 SAMMIES… and we spoke to
 Tom Fox of the Partnership for Public Service about how YOU can help recognize good work… and a programming note: Starting on Thursday, we will be introducing you to the SAMMIES finalists.

There were a number of stories competing for the big issue this week.



  • One was the budget. The House late in the week approved a bill that would adjust sequestration. The New York Times reports that the house approved the legislation that would cut $310 billion from the deficit over the next decade — and it shifted the cuts away from defense spending and toward domestic programs. The Times notes the bill has no chance of passing the Senate and the White House issued a veto threat saying the bill fails the test of fairness and shared responsibility.
  • Meanwhile the 
House passed the first appropriations bill of the year — a measure that would spend $51 billion on the departments of Commerce, Justice, NASA and other related agencies. The Hill notes that the bill is the least controversial of the 12 annual appropriations bill and — are you sensing a theme here — it has no chance of making it through the Senate and the White House issued a veto threat. The White House has said President Obama will veto any and all of the 12 bills until the House renounces the top-line spending level in the overall budget written by Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.). The legislation cuts spending by about 3 percent compared to current levels, which Republicans said shows their ongoing commitment to trim spending. The GOP said spending by agencies covered by the bill has been cut by 20 percent over the last three budget cycles.
  • The
 House also voted for a plan that would increase the percentage of salary that federal employees must pay toward their retirement benefits. But — ready for it — the plan is unlikely to make it through the Senate.
  • The gay marriage discussion. This is mostly a policy issue and we’ll leave that for others, but it does indicate the ongoing battle between the White House and Capitol Hill. The
 Washington Post notes that on the same day President Obama became the first president to fully embrace same-sex marriage, House Republicans once again approved measures that limit Obama administration policy decisions and federal policies favorable to gays and lesbians… they voted to bar the Justice Department from using any federal funds to oppose the Defense of Marriage Act. And the House Armed Services Committee voted to bar gay and lesbian service members from getting married or holding “marriage-like” ceremonies at military facilities.

Our Issue of the Week:
 It’s public service recognition week. The time when managers and the public are supposed to take a step back and really highlight the amazing work government workers do on a daily basis. But this year has been rough for many feds — especially those in the Secret Service — who are facing a public service nightmare with the prostitution scandals in Colombia and El Salvador. So for our issue of the week we wanted to harken back to a time when the Secret Service was held in really high esteem. A new book Rawhide Down draws on exclusive new interviews and never-before-seen documents, photos, and videos about the near assassination of President Ronald Reagan. The book’s author Del Quentin Wilber told me what he thinks of the current scandals hitting the Secret Service.

Weekend Reads:




  • What impact will cloud computing have on CIOs?
 Keith Engelbert
is CIO of 

Student Transportation Inc., an operator of school buses, writes in
 Fortune about a recent report about, “The Changing Role of the CFO,” and it found that 17 percent of corporate financial decision-makers believe the position of the chief information officer will disappear from the business landscape in the next five years. Why? The cloud. Technology has dramatically changed the way organizations invest in and consume technology — and CIOs who do not value the cloud in today’s current IT environment are putting an expiration date on their usefulness in the enterprise. CIOs need to fundamentally shift their strategic thinking as it relates to technology because cloud services all but guarantee uptime and data’s availability. CIOs can now use cloud services to focus on how data is accessed, shared and used within the organization which is the next evolution of the title.
  • Why Do Our Best and Brightest End Up in Silicon Valley and Not D.C.?
The Atlantic says that the country’s most thoughtful used to look to politics to make a difference on issues like healthcare reform. But now they come to Google Ventures. And David Ewing Duncan sat down with Bill Maris, who leads Google Ventures. Maris says that government is really successful when it’s willing to make big bold objectives like: We’re going to get to the moon. And they’re willing to invest in those things to get there. He says there never was a bold statement like — we’re going to invent the Internet. Instead it was government investing in these technologies and things will develop from them… and that flows out to universities, which flows out to companies. Maris says that this system has given us a lot, and he says he hope will continue to give us in the future. But without leaders with big ideas we get stuck.
  • How do you create a culture that embraces innovation?
 Scott Anthony of Innosight says it requires a highly engaged leadership and the right motivating factors — guess what? It isn’t only money… and, in fact, he mentions a
 DorobekINSIDER Book Club book — Daniel Pink’s
Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
  • Why does it seem that CEOs don’t get innovation?
 Stephan Lindegard writes that top executives are risk adverse, and too often they aren’t taught how to be innovative. We have his post of five reasons why CEOs don’t get innovation…
  • Finally, are you addicted to Facebook? Well, have you tried to cut down your Facebook time, but you haven’t… or can’t… Or is Facebook impacting your ability to do your job? 
Mashable writes this is becoming a problem, apparently. Meanwhile in
 Fast Company, Martin Lindstrom writes about how he managed to put down his iPhone… and even not jump to Google to answer every trivial question that arises.

Written by jarvisdorobek

May 11, 2012 at 1:09 PM

Posted in Uncategorized