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Archive for January 22nd, 2009

GSA gets a new acting acting administrator — Paul Prouty

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Paul Prouty

Paul Prouty

The Obama administration today named Paul Prouty, has been named the acting GSA administrator. Prouty has been the Assistant Regional Administrator for Public Buildings Service (PBS) in the Rocky Mountain Region. Jim Williams, who has been serving as the acting administrator since the departure of Lurita Doan last year, will return to his post as the commissioner of GSA’s Federal Acquisition Service. That also means that Tyree Varnado, who has been serving as the acting commissioner of GSA’s FAS, will be the deputy FAS commissioner. Barney Brasseux will remain in the career post as deputy administrator. Insiders tell me that this was expected. It is unclear if this means that Prouty might be nominated as the GSA administrator. Most guess not.

NOTE: I have updated this post. I had originally said that Varnado was going to be deputy administrator. Clearly that is not the case. So… Prouty as acting administrator… Brasseux continues in the career post as deputy administator… Williams back as FAS commissioner… and Varnado as FAS deputy commissioner.

Read Prouty’s bio after the break.
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Written by cdorobek

January 22, 2009 at 3:30 PM

Government Insights’ crystal ball: More TARP issues, and Gov 2.0 gets redefined

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gilogoPredictions are always difficult — we often have a difficult enough time knowing what’s going on right now that trying to predict what’s going to happen in the future ends up being a humbling experience. (These days, when looking back on the economic crash, in hindsight, everybody is saying, ‘We told you…’ Um — right!) So I’m generally pretty happy to just live in the present where I actually have some control over what I do. That being said, it is fascinating to take a strategic look at the future — where should we be spending our time, energy, efforts and resources.

IDC’s Government Insights are generally very… well, insightful. They just came out with their most recent newsletter and it has their top 10 predictions for 2009.

1. Government will stumble in its new role of managing financial institutions and related “bail-out” programs, which require new skills, training, and technology.
2. Infrastructure programs will move to hosted “pay as you go” models to more cost-competitively deliver government programs.
3. Shared services will hit the tipping point in 2009 due to budget constraints and delivery demands.
4. Cyber attacks will increase and interfere with government financial systems.
5. The U.S. President’s high tech communication style will accelerate an anytime, anywhere communications boom.
6. State budget shortages will force renegotiation of outsourcing contracts.
7. The government talent pool “leak” will slow, but the right talent won’t be in place to meet new demands.
8. Gov 2.0 will be redefined and will not be optional in 2009.
9. Fraud detection will be the insurance policy for increased investment in health and financial programs.
10. Federal spending will flow, but not grow as in recent years. Programs that support economic recovery, citizen health and welfare – with a priority on veterans, and energy management will be the winners.

Read more of Government Insights predictions in their newsletter here.

And I actually wouldn’t have a problem if gov 2.0 gets “redefined.” I think the folks at the National Academy of Public Administration’s Collaboration Project were actually very insightful with their name — in the end, these tools are about collaboration, sharing information, the power of information — shared information, and the theory that all of us are smarter then each of us individually. In the end, it is democracy. (Editor’s note: I actually brainstormed with NAPA about the name of the Collaboration Project, so… )

After the break, more from Government Insights on government 2.0…
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Written by cdorobek

January 22, 2009 at 10:35 AM