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Another Fed 100 name: Microsoft Federal’s Teresa Carlson

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fed100webWe’ve been tracking the winners of Federal Computer Week’s 2009 Federal 100 Awards — see here and here — and we’ve learned yet another winner: Teresa Carlson, the head of Microsoft Federal.

Carlson his immensely passionate about her job — and remarkably creative. It was her idea to create a Microsoft Federal CTO — a chief transition officer. And she’s managed to grow her business while maintaining the focus on the government’s need. She always goes above and beyond. I’ll look forward to reading FCW’s write-up in March.

Congratulations.

The list should be posted very soon, FCW insiders tell me.

Written by cdorobek

February 12, 2009 at 10:41 PM

Posted in awards, Circuit

Learning about more the 2009 Fed 100 winners: EPA’s O’Neill and McCaffery win

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fed100webI mentioned that the winners of Federal Computer Week’s Federal 100 Awards were notified this week and at least two CJD nominees were winners: Navy CIO Robert Carey, and Frank DiGiamarino, vice president of strategic initiatives at the National Academy of Public Administration.

I have learned that two other CJD-favs have been recognized. Former EPA CIO Molly O’Neill and Mary McCaffery, EPA’s Senior Advisor to the Chief Information Officer. Both have been just remarkable in the past year — and past years. Frankly, as I said in my nominations , former EPA Deputy Administrator Marcus Peacock deserves recognition as well. EPA has been really innovative in how it uses technology to reach out to its multitude of constituents. They really were out when Peacock was the first government official to post a blog… there with the Puget Sound initiative two years ago…  and they have only pressed further.

The most remarkable thing about EPA — and EPA’s leadership — is they fostered an innovative environment where people were not afraid to try something new.

The recognition is much deserved.

I look forward to seeing the full Fed 100 list. The annual Federal 100 Awards Gala — the 20th anniversary of that event — will take place March 25.

Here is O’Neill talking about the Puget Sound initiative:

Written by cdorobek

February 12, 2009 at 3:47 PM

Posted in awards, Circuit

Fed 100 winners are notified, list posted soon

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fed100webFederal Computer Week has notified winners of the prestigious Federal 100 awards (here is the 2008 list of winners) and, I’m told that the list will be posted by early next week at the latest for all of us to review.

I have been able to determine that at least two of the people I nominated for Fed 100 awards have been selected: Navy CIO Robert Carey, and Frank DiGiamarino, vice president of strategic initiatives at the National Academy of Public Administration. We won’t know the judges reasoning behind the decisions until the Fed 100 issue of Federal Computer Week is published in March, but… both are deserving.

I look forward to seeing the full list when it gets posted.

The annual Federal 100 Awards Gala — the 20th anniversary of that event — will take place March 25.

Written by cdorobek

February 11, 2009 at 9:59 PM

Posted in awards, Circuit

Fed 100 nomination: NAPA’s Frank DiGiamarino

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I mentioned earlier that I have been posting my nominations for Federal Computer Week’s Fed 100 awards.

FCW cover, March 3, 2008I noted earlier that I was going to make — and post — a number of nominations for Federal Computer Week’s Fed 100 awards. Earlier, I posted about EPA’s Jeremy Ames… then Navy CIO Robert Carey… now NAPA’s Frank DiGiamarino for the creation of NAPA’s Collaboration Project.

Describe this person’s job
DiGiammarino serves as Vice President of Strategic Initiatives at the National Academy of Public Administration. In that role, he leads the creation and execution of special initiatives at the National Academy that can deliver innovative approaches to addressing government’s management challenges.

Describe the work for which this person is being nominated
DiGiammarino is being recognized for the creation in 2008 of NAPA’s Collaboration Project, an initiative that pulls together government 2.0 lessons learned, case studies, policies, procedures — all in a safe environment that theNAPA can provide. NAPA’s Collaboration Project has — wisely — been out front in focusing on the collaborative parts of Web 2.0, which have the particular ability to help government organizations. The Collaboration Project has brought together leaders — publicly and privately — to work on a wide range of issues from how Web 2.0 tools can work to policy considerations implicit with these tools.

What impact did this work have on the person’s organization or the larger federal IT community?
NAPA’s Collaboration Project is a unique initiative — created at a time when many other organizations were not taking Web 2.0 serious. NAPA is providing real examples of what has worked — and what hasn’t — and why. It is providing a safe place to discuss the multi-faceted issues related to Web 2.0 tools from security and privacy to policy and leadership implications implicit in Web 2.0. That work has helped agencies from the EPA to OMB do exactly what they should be doing — test the waters. With the Collaboration Project, eachinactive has built on the lessons learned of those that went before.

In what way did the nominee go above and beyond their job description?
NAPA created the Collaboration Project when Web 2.0 was nothing more than a buzz word. NAPA took a risk by making this a real focus of its work and providing real leadership for government agencies.

If needed, provide any additional background information to support this nomination
NAPA’s Collaboration Project
The collaboration gurus: The Collaboration Project, led by the National Academy of Public Administration, looks to be a center of excellence focused on the Web 2.0 world and how these tools can help government [Federal Computer Week, 03.03.2008]

Written by cdorobek

January 6, 2009 at 10:55 PM

Fed 100 nomination: Navy CIO Robert Carey

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I mentioned earlier that I have been posting my nominations for Federal Computer Week’s Fed 100 awards.

I noted earlier that I was going to make — and post — a number of nominations for Federal Computer Week’s Fed 100 awards. Earlier, I posted about EPA’s Jeremy Ames. Now — Robert Carey, the Navy Department’s chief information officer.

Describe this person’s job
Carey is the chief information officer for the Department of the Navy

Describe the work for which this person is being nominated
Carey has won several Fed 100 awards, including being selected last year. But Carey has once again been a leader in the past 12 months, particularly in the areas of Web 2.0. In January 2008, Carey was the firstCIO to host a public blog, which he has used to reach out to the Navy Department community generally — but also the community generally on subjects ranging from information security to trust to privacy. But beyond that, Carey was also the firstCIO to issue a policy enabling the Navy to use Web 2.0.

What impact did this work have on the person’s organization or the larger federal IT community?
The Navy Web 2.0 policy has been widely seen as a potential model for other agencies particularly because it focuses on enabling Web 2.0 rather then limiting it. And Carey’s blog has inspired otherCIOs — and there are several CIO bloggers now.

In what way did the nominee go above and beyond their job description?
Both the blog and the Web 2.0 policy are firsts among the CIO community.

If needed, provide any additional background information to support this nomination
Navy CIO blog:
http://www.doncio.navy.mil/blog.aspx
The Navy Web 2.0 blog can be found here:
https://dorobekinsider.com/2008/11/04/hear-the-navy-cio-talk-about-the-navys-web-20-policy/
There is also a link here:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/9616910/Navy-Web-20-policy-Utilizing-New-Web-Tools-

Written by cdorobek

January 5, 2009 at 11:15 PM

Posted in awards, CIOs, Web 2.0

Fed 100 nomination: EPA’s Jeremy Ames

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fed100I noted earlier that I was going to make — and post — a number of nominations for Federal Computer Week’s Fed 100 awards. Of course, nothing motivates like a deadline — and the deadline is COB today. (You can post your nominations to FCW online at www.fcw.com/fed100. The 1105 Government Information Group sites migrated to a new content management system over the weekend — you can tell by the redesigned sites — but there are a number of loose ends — including the Fed 100 nomination form. So my guess is they will give people time to get their nominations in, I hope.)

As I noted, I will post my nomination here as well.

This one is for EPA’s Jeremy Ames, who spearheaded that wonderful project to create radon public service announcements by tapping in to the power of us.

Describe this person’s job
Jeremy Ames works for EPA’s Indoor Environments Division, which is responsible for air quality of indoor environments. This includes everything from asthma to radon.

Describe the work for which this person is being nominated
Ames was responsible for creating public service announcements. The challenge: Educate people about the dangers or radon. Rather then just hiring a company and paying them to create these PSAs for EPA, he used an innovative Web 2.0 approach: He let people create them for the EPA. And they did. They created their PSAs — and posted them on YouTube — and then EPA let people vote on the best one. Not only did they get more bang for EPA’s buck — you can see the videos for yourself.

What impact did this work have on the person’s organization or the larger federal IT community?

This was an innovative experiment — and should be an example to many other federal agencies — it was low risk and potentially high reward. Ames led the effort — and one of the most wonderful parts of it is that he did it largely under the radar. Most of EPA’s senior management team didn’t know about it. That is a real credit to their efforts to create a culture where people feel empowered to try something new. But it is a wonderful example of where an agency decided that it didn’t have to control the message — in the end, the people impacted by radon know more than anybody else. Ames allowed them to tell their stories.

In what way did the nominee go above and beyond their job description?

This experiment seems so easy, but as we know, few things are really easy. This was Ames idea — and he carried it out. The concept is simple, but he had to swim against the tide. The project spurred the creation of a its own social network of people impacted by radon, radonleaders.org.

View the winning video here… view the runners up here… and hear EPA’s Ames and Tom Kelly talk about it on Federal News Radio 1500 AM’s Daily Debrief with Chris Dorobek and Amy Morris here.

Written by cdorobek

January 5, 2009 at 9:36 AM

Posted in awards, Circuit

Fed 100 deadline postponed… happy Christmas!

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For those of us busy working on Fed 100 nominations… we have some additional time — until Jan. 5, in fact.

FCW’s Michael Hardy posted on FCW’s blog:

FCW Insider: Fed 100 deadline extended

Good news for those of you struggling to complete Federal 100 nominations by the original Dec. 23 deadline: You have some more time.

We’ve extended the deadline to close of business (call it 5 p.m.) Jan. 5. You can find details on who is qualified to win the awards and the electronic entry form here.

The awards will honor 100 of the most accomplished members of the federal IT community, but we can only know about the accomplishments that set them out as deserving the recognition if you tell us. Take some time to nominate your colleagues who have performed well above and beyond their job requirements this year.

Contact FCW News Editor Michael Hardy or Editorial Assistant Timieka Nichols with any questions.

Written by cdorobek

December 23, 2008 at 10:38 AM

Posted in awards